Tag Archives: nutrition

The Conflict of Interest with Dietary Supplement Recommendations

Personal Trainers always are always look to maximize their time and money while doing training sessions month after month.  Once established as a certified personal trainer, you set your rate with clients (or your training facility does), and fill your schedule with as many clients as you can until inevitably trainers reach a plateau. Either you have some sanity in your day, and allow a healthy work/life balance, or you have more clients than you can handle and work 14 hour days training non stop. Either way your income hits a snag, and the certified personal trainer looks for alternative sources of revenue to boost their bottom line. The growing trend seems to be advising clients and other health conscious people on diet and workout supplements. This article will address some of the issues with the personal trainers and companies selling nutritional supplement to make extra money.

The client/certified personal trainer relationship is meant to be based on trust as well as a trainer having a competent understanding of the body and how to get their client to exercise safely, efficiently, and effectively. This is in the personal trainers scope of practice, to practice and preach what they learned either from a degree or certification, or both. Today, more personal trainers are veering away from their scope of practice and offering nutritional and dietary advice to their clients with no training in order to make more income. The conflict of interest arises when trainers get paid money make to make recommendations for certain dietary supplement companies. Whats even worse is you have lay people also recommending these products with no knowledge of whats in them.  You may have seen reps for companies such as Advocare, BodyByVi, Herbalife, and Juice Plus just to name a few.  They use a MLM system to recruit trainers as well as everyday people to pitch their fitness products to the masses in hopes of getting more people to rep product. The issue with many of these products is that they have never been reviewed by the FDA, and their quality is only “certified” by the companies who distribute them.

Due to The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, the FDA has limits on when and how they can act when it comes to dietary supplementation.  To many peoples surprise the supplement industry is very loosely regulated by the FDA. Basically, there is no regulation until a product is brought to the FDA documenting harmful affects.  A perfect example of this was back in 2009, the #1 dietary supplement on the market Hydroxycut which claimed to help burn body fat. Hydroxycut was finally was pulled after it was determined to have caused 23 serious health concerns including liver failure, and a fatality. This goes to show that what people can potentially recommend for you has no safety factors and potentially could be very harmful to your body. Shortly after being pulled from the market, Hydroxycut changed their formula and now can be found in supplement stores nationwide.  They also reformulated a second time after another death occurred while some was taking their product.

To best illustrate the conflict, I can look back at my story and the decision I had to make while considering a job offer. I moved to Atlanta in 2011 looking to break into the fitness industry.  I was certified and ready to make a difference in peoples lives through exercise.  I had a job interview from an in home personal training company whose owner also happened to be a representative from one of the companies mentioned above.  Since I was not trained in nutrition, or a R.D. I did not feel comfortable going beyond my scope of practice.  Here are two of the email exchanges:

Me:  I am interested in the personal training aspect especially if it’s around the city. I’m not thrilled about the product or a lot of the reviews it’s getting online and it’s reputation. If any due diligent customer did some research on the product they would at best get mixed reviews. If there is a market in the city then I would like to train those people but until I review the product more I would not push it to every client. Would that be a problem?
His Response was as follows:
I know you are skeptical man, and I don’t blame you.  If its not right for you now, maybe it will be down the line sometime.  I look at the Redacted angle like this;  I have been recommending Optimum Nutrition 100% Whey for the last 5 years.  I feel confident in them because they are the #1 protein brand in the world.  I bet I have convinced well over 100 people to buy the product.  And what has that gotten me in return?  The answer is NOTHING.  When I go buy the product, its still FULL price.  When my clients go buy the product, its still FULL price.  At some point, we need to be compensated for our recommendations.

This was the introduction I received in the fitness industry, regardless of the benefit of the product to the client, make sure you are compensated.

So in conclusion, I hope that before you opt to put something in your body, please do the research. Do I need this? Can I get these same benefits from food? Does the person have proper training to recommend this product?  If you can ensure well balanced meals are eaten on a regular basis, there shouldn’t be a need for supplementation. Combine healthy eating with exercise and the health benefits are exponential.

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Are you eating correctly for your body type?

Most people get their diet advice or meal ideas from magazines or the internet which generally has the latest and greatest one size fits all plan. While the plan or idea may have great concepts about losing/gaining weight, it never touches on the fact that each person is different based on their bodies.  In fact, most people fall into one of three somatoypes, or body types.  In order to get the best results you need to be able to customize your meals and macro nutrients around your body type and goals.

People need to be basing their macro nutrients around their specific body type.  People generally are either ectomorphs, who are characterized long and thin muscles and limbs with lower fat storage. Typically these people want to gain muscle strength and size or maintain body weight for endurance sports. Mesomorphs, typically have larger bones, a solid torso, wide shoulders, trim waist, and naturally muscular and athletic. Their goals generally are to continue to build muscle mass while maintaining a low body fat percentage. Endomorphs, usually are naturally thick and broad with higher fat storage and wider waist and large bone structure. Most goals are centered around fat loss.  While there are several other variations of these categories, its important as a starting point to find your somatotype, and base your meals and macro nutrients off your goals (build muscle, lose fat, gain/lose/maintain weight).

How many calories you need to be eating is based on your body weight and activity level throughout your day.  As a baseline measurement you can take your body weight in pounds and multiple it by the chart below as it corresponds with your activity level.

Calorie Estimator

For Example a 180 lb endomorph male that is moderately active working out 3-4 times per week and wants to lose weight would eat between 2160 (180×12) to 2540 (180×14) calories per week.

After discovering how much calories you will be consuming a day, we get to the customization that has been lacking from all the previous diets! The most important part is giving your body what it needs in macro nutrients.  Depending on your body type and goals this chart is a very good starting point in order to make the meals and macro nutrients work most efficiently for you.

bodytype2

Converting grams to calories 1g fat=9 calories, 1g carbs=4 calories, 1 g protein=4 calories

If we were to take that same 180 lb man looking to lose body weight his diet would need to consist of 35% protein, 25% carbs and 40% fat.  If he were to eat a fixed diet at 2160 calories we could break it down as follows: 2160 calories x .35=756 calories 756/4=189 grams of protein, 2160 x .25=540 calories, 540 calories/4=135 grams of carbs, and 2160 calories x.4=864, 864 calories/9=96g of fats. We are able to figure out both total grams and calories of each macro nutrient we should be consuming each day for our desired goal. This is one of the best ways to achieve results for your own body type and see great results.

In conclusion, before starting out on your next dieting adventure, see if the next great weight gain/ loss plan is right for your body type.  In no way is the process mentioned above the only way to achieve your desired results but it is very effective.  For more information on how to individualize your meal plan contact me at firefighterfitnessllc@gmail.com

Dining out on a Diet: Our Guide to Atlanta’s Healthiest Hot Spots

Everyone loves to go out to eat; a statement made evident by the fact that Americans eat out an average of 4-5 times a week. And why not? It’s quick, easy, clean-up free, and a great way to get out and socialize with family and friends. However, studies have shown that the average restaurant meal contains over 1000 calories, which can make dining out on a diet nearly impossible. It’s unrealistic to expect yourself to stay in and cook every single night, so what’s the solution to this calorie conundrum? We’ve put together a review of Atlanta-area restaurants that offer up healthier alternatives to the calorie bombs you’d encounter elsewhere. So go ahead and treat yourself to a fun night out, minus the guilt!

Seasons 52

If you’re looking for the perfect Friday night date spot, but want to avoid the rich and hearty fare often offered at romantic restaurants, Seasons 52 is the perfect choice. The atmosphere is casually sophisticated, and the menu offers a wide variety of healthy dishes prepared with fresh, local ingredients. The theme at Seasons 52 is “healthy indulgence,” and it delivers just that; delicious fare that you can enjoy without feeling guilty afterward. The menu features everything from baked flatbreads to grilled seafood to wood-fired steaks, lamb and pork chops, along with an extensive wine list. Even better? Nothing on the menu is over 500 calories, and the nutritional information on each dish is readily available to help you make the right choice for you. The best part? You can even enjoy a guilt-free dessert! All of the dessert offerings at Seasons 52 are served in a shot glass, so you get just enough to satisfy a sweet tooth without feeling like you’ve demolished your diet, and with flavors like key lime pie, rocky road, and chocolate peanut butter mousse, who could resist a little post-meal indulgence?

Seasons 52 is located in Buckhead at 3050 Peachtree Rd. NW and in Dunwoody at 90 Perimeter Center West.

Cafe Sunflower

For all of the vegetarian/vegans out there, Cafe Sunflower is a must-stop spot in Atlanta. A small, cafe-like feel with simple decor, reasonable prices, and a casual vibe, Cafe Sunflower is the perfect place to enjoy a light lunch with friends or a weeknight dinner date without breaking your wallet or your waistline. If your strictly vegan, it’s difficult if not almost impossible to find a dish let alone a whole menu that caters to your dietary restrictions, but Cafe Sunflower does just that. Everything on the menu is meat-free, and the few dishes that include dairy products such as real cheese are labeled as such so that any level of vegan can easily navigate the menu and find something they can eat. And with menu items such as Berry Barbecue Tempeh, Baked Stuffed Acorn Squash, and Orzo Eggplant Lasagna, who wouldn’t find something to please their palate?

Sunflower Cafe is located in Buckhead at 2140 Peachtree Rd. NW and in Sandy Springs at 5975 Roswell Rd.

R. Thomas Deluxe Grill

No article on healthy restaurants in Atlanta would be complete without R. Thomas, a family-owned eatery that has become a landmark in the Brookwood Hills neighborhood since it’s opening back in 1985. Self-described as an “oasis in the city,” R. Thomas’ eclectic decor and trademark patio surrounded by various plants and caged tropical birds, it certainly lives up to that description. The menu is based on the philosophy that food is medicine, and that a diet free of preservatives and pesticides will ultimately lead to better health. They serve breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and menu items include everything from quinoa stir-frys to pastas to grilled chicken and fish to Southwestern entrees such as tacos, burritos and wraps. They are also known for their fresh, made to order juices and smoothies, making it the perfect stop for a pre-workout fuel-up or post-workout snack. Also, R. Thomas is open 24/7, so Atlantans can enjoy fresh, healthy fare any time of day, any day of the week.

R. Thomas is located in Brookwood Hills at 1812 Peachtree st. NW.

True Food Kitchen

True Food Kitchen is a growing restaurant chain which recently expanded into Atlanta with their newest location at Lenox Mall in Buckhead. The basis of the cuisine at True Food Kitchen comes from the anti-inflammatory diet, an eating plan designed to reduce chronic inflammation which can cause a number of health issues and diseases. Inflammatory foods are those that are high in antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids, and are prepared without the use of added fats, oils, butter, and salt. True Food Kitchen aims to popularize these healthy foods by preparing them in a way that looks good and tastes good too, and serving them in a trendy restaurant environment that will bring people in whether they’re grabbing a quick bite during the workday or enjoying a Friday night out with friends. The menu offers a wide variety of dishes including salads, pizzas, appetizers, entrees, sandwiches and burgers using lean meats such as turkey and bison instead of beef. They also have a selection of natural refreshments using antioxidant-rich fruits, veggies, spices and teas as ingredients. Even the restaurant itself is sustainable, using recycled wood and materials in their floors and furnishings. With it’s fresh, tasty cuisine and bright, fun atmosphere True Food Kitchen is one chain that’s definitely worth a try; just order the edamame dumpling appetizer and you’ll see what I mean!

True Food Kitchen is located in the Lenox Square Mall at 3393 Peachtree Rd. NE

Carbohydrates: Friend or Foe?

How many times have you heard a friend, family member or coworker say “I’m going on a low-carb diet”? Chances are, you probably know someone (maybe even you) that has tried this method for weight loss. And why not? The Atkins diet, the Paleo diet, and countless others advise that going low-carb is the key to achieving the body of your dreams. But is this really the answer to healthy, sustainable weight loss? Could it be that carbohydrates get a bad rap not because we don’t need them but because most of us don’t know how to use them to our advantage, which begs the question; carbs: friend or foe?

When food is digested, it leaves the stomach and enters the intestines where it is absorbed into the blood stream in the form of blood glucose, which is then stored in the muscle cells as “glycogen” or fuel for our bodies.  This process is known as “gastric emptying time.” Gastric emptying time varies based on what you eat, and when the process is complete your blood glucose levels drop, signaling that it’s time to eat again. Proteins have a gastric emptying time of around 2 hours, while fats take 3-5 hours. Carbohydrates however, take between 20 and 40 minutes. This is why we often feel an energy crash shortly after eating a carb-heavy meal. This is also why carbohydrates have gotten such a bad reputation. However, studies conducted on gastric emptying time have found that when you add a protein in with a carbohydrate, gastric emptying time is slowed considerably (remember; it takes 2 hours for proteins to be digested). This allows for blood glucose levels to rise slowly and drop slowly, releasing steady energy for the body to use effectively and preventing that dreaded energy crash. For this reason, proteins should always be present in a meal that includes carbohydrates. The only time it is acceptable to have carbohydrates alone is immediately after exercising because glycogen synthase levels are high, so the body will take all that glycogen and store it in the cells for later use. If you eat a high-carb meal and then engage in a sedentary activity like sitting at a desk or in front of the TV, the glycogen will instead be stored as fat because the body can’t use it right away. So, instead of swearing off all carbs, we just need to know how to eat them so our bodies can use them properly.

Now that we’ve established that carbohydrates are vital for providing energy to our cells, how do we know how much and what types we should eat? The American College of Sports Medicine recommends that 58% of our diet should consist of carbohydrates, the RDA recommends 130 grams per day, and the Institute of Medicine recommends anywhere from 45-65% or more depending on the individual and their level of activity. Runners, for example, probably need closer to 70%. Why? Carbohydrates are our fuel. They are the body’s greatest source of energy. You wouldn’t get in the car for a cross-country road trip without putting gas in the tank first, right? However, you wouldn’t need as much gas if you were only going for a drive down the road. This is the mentality that one should use when determining how many grams of carbohydrates they should be eating daily. So, how do you know the amount of carbohydrates that is right for you? First of all, you need to know how many total calories you should be taking in daily. It is beneficial to enlist the help of a nutritionist or dietician when determining this, but you can get a good idea using this simple formula:

1. Calculate your BMR (basal metabolic rate). This is the amount of food your body requires just to maintain it’s most basic functions (breathing, digestion, etc.). You can figure this out by taking your weight in kilograms (lbs./2.2) and multiplying it by 1 if you are a male and 0.9 if you are female (this represents the calories burned per kilogram per hour). Multiply that number by 24 (hours in a day) and you have your BMR.

2. Add in your activity factor. If you are sedentary (you do not exercise at all and have a job that requires little to no physical activity), give yourself a 1.1. If you are on your feet at least half of the day, give yourself a 1.2 for light activity. If you are on your feet most of the day, give yourself a 1.3. If your job requires a lot of physical activity (manual labor), give yourself a 1.4.

3. Calculate your daily exercise expenditure, or the amount of calories you burn during exercise per day. This can be a little tricky, which is why it may be helpful to have a nutritionist or dietician assist in getting the most accurate calculation possible. You will need to consider how many days a week you work out and what kinds of workouts you do to get approximate number of calories burned per workout (be careful not to overestimate). 

4. Take your BMR and multiply it by your activity factor, then add your daily exercise expenditure. Now you have a good idea of how many calories you should be eating daily.

5. Now, calculate 58% of that number and you have a general idea of how many calories per day need to come from carbohydrates. Carbs have 4 calories per gram, so take that number and divide by 4 to figure out how many grams of carbs that equals.

Now that you have a general idea of how many grams of carbohydrates your body requires to keep you going, it is equally as important to know which kinds of carbohydrates are best. There are two types of carbohydrates; simple and complex. Simple carbohydrates consist of sugars (fruit juices, white breads and pastas, corn syrups, etc.), while complex carbohydrates consist of starches (whole grains, beans, legumes, etc.). You should never eat a food with more than 20% of it’s carbs coming from sugar. In general, this means that we should stick with the complex carbohydrates as they are more filling and slower to digest. While fruit does include sugar and simple carbohydrates, they also have essential vitamins and nutrients that your body needs, so you don’t need to neglect these foods entirely. Just remember to limit your intake and combine your fruit with a protein to keep those blood glucose levels in check.

Carbs don’t need to seem like the enemy; following these simple rules will help you to turn them into a useful tool toward reaching your weight loss goals in a healthy and effective way.

 

It’s Superbowl Sunday! Sip smart with our Cocktail Calorie Guide!

Snacking is as big of an addition to Superbowl Sunday as catching the commercials, and no matter what your plans are for the big game, you’ve probably got a medley of munchies to enjoy during the football festivities. We all know that nothing goes as well with a big pile of nachos and hot wings like a couple of ice cold beers, but your game day drinks can add hundreds of calories to an already fattening feast. And while it’s perfectly okay to relax on your diet a little bit this evening, there are some simple swaps you can make to lighten the calorie load a little and still enjoy yourself. The following guide to cocktail calories will help you navigate the beer aisle and make the best choices so you can have fun this Superbowl Sunday without feeling too much guilt come Monday.

*The numbers listed on this chart are an estimate and are subject to change based on changes in the brewers’ recipes. Calories and carbs are based on 12 oz. servings.

Beer                                     Classification                          Alcohol Percentage         Calories         Carbohydrates

Amstel    Light Amstel Light
3.5
95
5

 

 

Alaskan Brewing Alaskan Amber
5
 
 
Alaskan    Brewing Alaskan Pale Ale
4.6
 
 
Alaskan    Brewing Alaskan Stout
5.7
 
 
Alaskan    Brewing Alaskan ESB
5
 
 
Alaskan    Brewing Alaskan Smoked Porter
6.1
 
 
Alaskan    Brewing Alaskan Winter Ale
6.2
 
 
Anchor Anchor Steam
4.9
152
 
Anchor Liberty Ale
6
188
 
Anchor Anchor Porter
5.6
205
 
Anchor Old Foghorn
 
 
 
Anchor Anchor Small
3.3
 
 
Anderson    Valley Boont Amber
5.8
 
 
Anderson    Valley Hop Ottin’
7
 
 
Anderson    Valley Poleeko Gold
5.5
 
 
Anderson    Valley Belk’s ESB
6.8
 
 
Anderson    Valley Barney Flats Oatmeal
5.7
 
 
Anderson    Valley Winter Solstice
6.9
 
 
Anderson    Valley High Rollers Wheat
5.3
 
 
Anderson    Valley Deep Enders Porter
5.5
 
 
Beamish Beamish Stout
3.8
131
 
Beck’s Beck’s
5
143
 
Bell’s/Kalamazoo Two Hearted Ale
7
 
 
Bell’s/Kalamazoo Amber Ale
5.5
 
 
Bell’s/Kalamazoo Pale Ale
5
 
 
Bell’s/Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Stout
6.5
 
 
Bell’s/Kalamazoo Oberon
6
 
 
Bell’s/Kalamazoo Double Cream Stout
7.5
 
 
Bell’s/Kalamazoo Third Coast Old Ale
10.2
 
 
Bell’s/Kalamazoo Expedition Stout
10
 
 
Bell’s/Kalamazoo Best Brown Ale
5.8
 
 
Bell’s/Kalamazoo Cherry Stout
8
 
 
Blue Moon Blue Moon White
5.4
171
12.9
Breckenridge Avalanche Amber
5.4
 
 
Breckenridge Autumn Ale
6.7
 
 
Breckenridge Pale Ale
5.7
 
 
Breckenridge Christmas Ale
7.4
 
 
Breckenridge Oatmeal Stout
5
 
 
Breckenridge Pandora’s Bock
5.8
 
 
BridgePort IPA
5.5
 
 
BridgePort Porter
5.5
 
 
BridgePort ESB
6.1
 
 
BridgePort Black Strap Stout
6
 
 
BridgePort Blue Heron
4.9
 
 
BridgePort Pintail Ale
5.2
 
 
BridgePort Ebenezer Ale
6.4
 
 
BridgePort Old Knucklehead
8.9
 
 
Budweiser    (U.S) Budweiser
5
143
10.6
Budweiser Bud Light
4.2
95
6.6
Budweiser Bud Ice
5.5
148
8.9
Budweiser Bud Ice Light
4.1
110
6.5
Budweiser Budvar Budvar
5
 
 
Busch Busch
4.6
133
10.2
Busch    Light Busch Light
4.2
110
6.7
Busch Ice Busch Ice
5.9
173
13
Clausthaler Clausthaler
0.4
96
5.8
Colt 45 Colt 45 Malt Liquor
6
172
 
Coors Coors Original
5
148
11.3
Coors Coors Light
4.2
102
5
Coors Coors Extra Gold
5
147
10.7
Coors Coors NA
<0.5
73
14.2
Corona Corona Light
4.5
109
5
Corona Corona Extra
4.6
148
 
Czechvar Czechvar
5
 
 
Deschutes Cascade Ale
4.5
140
 
Deschutes Mirror Pond Pale
5.3
175
 
Deschutes Bachelor ESB
5.4
180
 
Deschutes Black Butte Porter
5.5
185
 
Deschutes Quail Springs IPA
5.8
200
 
Deschutes Obsidian Stout
6.7
220
 
Deschutes Jubelale
6.7
 
 
Deschutes Broken Top Bock
7
233
 
Deschutes Pine Mountain Pils
5.1
154
 
Deschutes Cinder Cone Red
5.8
180
 
Dos Equis Dos Equis XX
4.8
145
 
Dragon    Stout Dragon Stout
6.8
220
 
Edison    Light Edison Light
 
109
6.5
Foster’s Foster’s Lager
5.1
156
 
Fuller’s Fuller’s ESB
5.9
 
 
Fuller’s Fuller’s London Pride
4.7
156
 
Genessee/High    Falls Genessee 12 Horse
4.8
152
14
Genessee/High    Falls Genny Light
3.6
96
5.5
Genessee/High    Falls Kipling Light Lager
3.4
99
8
Grolsch Grolsch
5
156
 
Gordon    Biersch Märzen
5.7
 
 
Gordon    Biersch Blonde Bock
7
 
 
Gordon    Biersch Pilsner
5.3
 
 
Guinness Guinness    Draught
4
125
10
Guinness Foreign Extra Stout
7.5
176
14
Hamm’s Hamm’s
4.7
144
12.1
Hamm’s Hamm’s Light
4.1
110
7.3
Heineken Heineken
5.4
166
9.8
Henry    Weinhard’s Weinhard’s Ale
4.6
147
13
Henry    Weinhard’s Weinhard’s Amber Ale
5.3
169
14
Henry    Weinhard’s Weinhard’s Dark
4.8
150
13.1
Henry    Weinhard’s Weinhard’s Hefeweizen
4.9
128
9.2
Henry    Weinhard’s Private Reserve
4.5
128
9.2
Hoegaarden Hoegaarden
5
 
 
I.C.    Light I.C. Light
 
96
2.9
Icehouse Icehouse 5.0
5
132
8.7
Icehouse Icehouse 5.5
5.5
149
9.8
J.W.    Dundee Honey Brown
4.5
150
13.5
Keystone Keystone Light
4.2
100
5
Kilarney’s Kilarney’s Red Lager
5
197
22.8
Killian’s Killian’s
4.9
163
13.8
Labatt Labatt Blue
5
153
 
Lowenbräu Lowenbräu
5.2
160
 
Marin    Brewing Mt. Tam Pale Ale
5
 
 
Marin    Brewing Bluebeery Ale
5
 
 
Marin    Brewing Albion Amber
5
 
 
Marin    Brewing Marin Weiss
5
 
 
Marin    Brewing Point Reyes Porter
6
 
 
Marin    Brewing Breakout Stout
6
 
 
Marin    Brewing Old Dipsea Barleywine
9
 
 
Marin    Brewing India Pale Ale
6
 
 
McMenamins Hammerhead
5.8
 
 
McMenamins Terminator
6.4
 
 
McMenamins Ruby
4.1
 
 
McMenamins Black Rabbit Porter
5.5
 
 
McMenamins Dry Irish Stout
4.6
 
 
Michelob Michelob
5
155
13.3
Michelob Michelob    Light
4.3
134
11.7
Michelob Michelob    Amber Bock
5.2
166
15
Michelob Michelob    Hefeweizen
5
152
11.8
Michelob Michelob    Honey Lager
4.9
175
17.4
Michelob Michelob    Black & Tan
5
168
15.8
Michelob Michelob    Ultra
4.2
95
2.6
Mickey’s Mickey’s
5.6
157
11.2
Mickey’s Mickey’s Ice
5.9
165
11.8
Miller Miller Genuine Draft
5
143
13.1
Miller Miller Genuine Draft Lite
4.2
110
7
Miller Miller High Life
5.5
156
11
Miller Miller Lite
4.2
96
3.2
Moosehead Moosehead
5
153
 
Murphy’s Murphy’s Irish Red
5
171
 
Murphy’s Murphy’s Stout
4
150
 
O’Douls O’Douls
0.4
70
13.3
O’Douls O’Douls Amber
0.4
90
18
Odell’s 90    Shilling
5.3
 
 
Odell’s Easy Street Wheat
4.7
 
 
Odell’s Cutthroat Porter
4.5
 
 
Odell’s Cutthroat Pale Ale
5.1
 
 
Odell’s Levity
5
 
 
Odell’s Isolation
6
 
 
Odell’s Bobby
4.6
 
 
Olde    English 800 Olde English 800
5.9
160
10.5
Olde    English 800 Olde English 800 Ice
7.9
216
14.3
Old    Milwaukee Old Milwaukee
5
156
 
Pabst Pabst
5
152
 
Paulaner Paulaner Original Munich
5.5
 
 
Paulaner Salvator
7.5
 
 
Paulaner Paulaner Hefe-Weizen
5.5
 
 
Pete’s    Brewing Pete’s Wicked Ale
5.3
174
17.7
Pete’s    Brewing Pete’s Oktoberfest
5.8
189
16.9
Pete’s    Brewing Pete’s Summer Brew
4.7
163
15.6
Pete’s    Brewing Pete’s Winter Brew
5.2
170
15.2
Pete’s    Brewing Pete’s Helles Lager
5
163
14.6
Pete’s    Brewing Pete’s Red Rush
5.3
170
14.8
Pete’s    Brewing Pete’s Strawberry Blonde
5
160
13.6
Pilsner    Urquell Pilsner Uruqell
4.3
160
 
Pittsburgh    Brewing I.C. Light
4.1
95
2.8
Pittsburgh    Brewing Iron City Lager
4.5
140
10
Pyramid Hefeweizen
5.2
 
 
Pyramid Coastline Pilsner
5
 
 
Pyramid Apricot Ale
5.1
 
 
Pyramid India Pale Ale
6.7
 
 
Pyramid Pale Ale
5.1
 
 
Pyramid Curve Ball Kölsch
4.8
 
 
Pyramid Broken Rake
6.4
 
 
Pyramid Tilted Kilt
6.3
 
 
Pyramid Snow Cap Ale
7
 
 
Red Dog Red Dog
5
147
14.1
Redhook Redhook    ESB
5.8
179
14.2
Redhook Redhook    IPA
6.5
188
12.7
Redhook Redhook    Blonde Ale
5.4
166
13.1
Redhook Redhook    Hefe-weizen
5.2
155
10.9
Redhook Redhook    Nut Brown
5.6
181
16
Rhinebecker Rhinebecker
5
106
2.5
St.    Pauli Girl St.    Pauli Girl
4.9
148
 
St.    Pauli Girl St.    Pauli Girl Dark
4.8
150
 
St.    Pauli Girl St.    Pauli Girl N.A.
<0.5
96
23
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Light
4.05
124
9.7
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Boston Lager
4.8
160
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Golden Pilsner
4.6
145
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Cream Stout
4.7
195
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Boston Ale
4.9
160
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Cherry Wheat
5.2
166
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Spring Ale
5.2
170
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Summer Ale
5.2
150
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Pale Ale
5.3
145
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Octoberfest
5.7
165
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams IPA
5.9
175
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Winter Lager
6.9
190
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Double Bock
8.5
240
 
Sam    Adams Sam    Adams Triple Bock
17.5
340
 
Sapporo Sapporo    Reserve
5.2
 
 
Shiner Shiner    Bock
4.4
143
12.5
Shiner Shiner    Light
3.9
120
9
Sierra    Nevada Sierra Nevada Pale Ale
5.6
200
12.3
Sierra    Nevada Sierra Nevada Porter
5.6
200
15.7
Sierra    Nevada Sierra Nevada Stout
5.8
210
19.4
Sierra    Nevada Sierra Nevada Wheat
4.4
150
11.8
Sierra    Nevada Sierra Nevada Summerfest
5
 
 
Sierra    Nevada Sierra Nevada Celebration
6.8
215
 
Sierra    Nevada Sierra Nevada Bigfoot
9.6
295
24.6
Stone    Brewing Arrogant    Bastard Ale
7.2
 
 
Stone    Brewing Stone Pale Ale
5.4
 
 
Stone    Brewing Stone Smoked Porter
5.9
 
 
Stone    Brewing Stone IPA
6.9
 
 
Stone    Brewing Ruination IPA
7.7
 
 
Stone    Brewing Double Bastard Ale
10
 
 
Stone    Brewing Stone Old Guardian
9.9
 
 
Tsingtao Tsingtao
4.7
152
 
Widmer Widmer    Hefeweizen
4.7
159
 
Widmer Widmer    Pale Ale
5
 
 
Widmer Widmer    Blonde Ale
4.3
 
 
Widmer Widmer Widberry
4.6
 
 
Widmer Widmer    Sommerbrä
4.8
 
 
Widmer Widmer    Oktoberfest
5
 
 
Widmer Widmer    Winternacht
7
 
 
Widmer Spring Run IPA
6
 
 
Widmer Drop Top Amber Ale
 
 
 
Yuengling Premium
4.4
135-140
12
Yuengling Light
3.8
98
6.6
Yuengling Ale
5
145-150
10
Yuengling Porter
4.5
150-155
14
Yuengling Lager
4.4
135-140
12
Yuengling Black & Tan
4.5
150-155
14
Yuengling Light Lager
3.6
96
8.5

 

             

 

Your favorite brew not on the list? Calculate the calories with this simple formula:

There are two reasons for beer’s caloric content: alcohol and carbohydrates. There are 7 calories per gram of alcohol, so the higher the alcohol volume, the more calories in the beer. An easy way to estimate how many calories are in your favorite beer is to multiply the ABV by 2.5 to get an estimate of calories per ounce. Multiply that number by the number of ounces and you have an estimate of how many calories are in each can or bottle of your favorite brew.

Now, lets get ready for some football!!

FALL in Love with this Season’s Best Superfoods: Five foods you should be eating now!

The temperatures are beginning to drop, and cool-season crops are reaching their peak. Take advantage of this season’s superfoods with our five favorites and healthy ways to enjoy them. We bet you’ll fall in love!

1. Pumpkin:

Starbuck’s Pumpkin Spice Latte’s aren’t the only way to enjoy this festive fall favorite! A cup of cooked pumpkin serves up 200% of your recommended daily intake of Vitamin A, which aids in healthy vision. Pumpkin is also a great source of fiber, potassium, and the antioxidant beta-carotene, which may help in the prevention of cancer. Even the seeds are healthy; they are rich in plant-based chemicals called phytosterols, which have been shown in studies to reduce LDL (“bad”) cholesterol.

Break away from plain ole pumpkin pies and breads and check out this incredible recipe below for Southwestern Pumpkin Burgers:

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/southwestern_pumpkin_burgers.html

2. Acorn and Butternut Squash:

Acorn and butternut squash both peak during the fall season, and while they add flavor to lots of delicious dishes, they offer up some serious health benefits to boot. Like pumpkin, these seasonal superfoods are an excellent source of fiber and potassium. They also contain Vitamin C and carotenoids, which help in the prevention of heart disease. As if that weren’t enough, butternut squash has anti-inflammatory properties which help stave of inflammation-related diseases such as asthma and arthritis.

Warm up with this delicious and nutritious recipe for Roasted Butternut Squash and Shallot Soup:

http://www.cookinglight.com/food/top-rated-recipes/healthy-butternut-squash-recipes-00400000055219/page5.html

3. Swiss Chard:

This leafy-green veggie is a nutritional powerhouse, offering up Vitamins A, K, and C, along with magnesium, potassium, iron, and fiber. It also contains calcium for bone health, lutein for eye health, and biotin for healthy skin and hair. Even better? One cup contains just 35 calories. Eat both the leaves and stems to make the most of these amazing health benefits!

Enjoy this flavor-packed food with this tasty recipe for Sautéed Swiss Chard and Parmesan Cheese:

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/sauteed-swiss-chard-with-parmesan-cheese/

4. Turnips and Rutabagas:

These root vegetables are rich in glucosinolates, which help the liver to fight off toxins, fight carcinogens, and help prevent the growth of tumors. They are also packed with vitamins including vitamins A, C, E, manganese, and beta-carotene. They also help to lower cholesterol and contain excellent amounts of folate, a B vitamin critical to cardiovascular health. High in fiber, these cruciferous veggies help aid in digestion and weight loss.

Give your mashed potatoes a makeover with this mashed turnip and rutabaga recipe even the kids will love:

http://www.yummly.com/recipe/Mashed-Rutabaga-_yellow-Turnip-Or-Swede_-And-Potato-Recipezaar?columns=3&position=14%2F69

5. Pears:

Pears reach their peak between the months of August and February, and bring with them some pretty impressive health benefits. They contain a water-soluble fiber called pectin, which helps to lower cholesterol levels and regulate the digestive system. They are also an excellent source of Vitamins B2, C, E, copper, and potassium. Another interesting fact about pears is that they are considered a hypo-allergenic fruit, meaning that they are less likely to produce an adverse affect than other fruits. Because of this, doctors often recommend them as a good fruit to introduce to infants. Additionally, they contain glutathione, which helps to prevent high blood pressure and stroke, and they even can even help boost your immune system and give you a quick burst of energy. If that’s not enough, pears provide a cooling effect that can actually help bring down a fever.

Need another reason to eat more pears? This peary good recipe for Arugula and Pear Salad with Maple Vinaigrette should do the trick:

http://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/arugula-pear-salad-maple-vinaigrette-10000001132435/index.html

Other seasonal superfoods to try this fall:

  • Grapes
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Persimmons
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Broccoli and Cauliflower
  • Cranberries

Happy Fall!

Have Your Hot Wings and Eat Them Too: Figure-Friendly Upgrades to your Football Favorites!

Football season is here again, and with it comes hot wings and cold beer! Unfortunately, however, it can also bring unwanted calories and extra fat. Instead of sacrificing your favorite football fare in order to watch your waistline, try these easy upgrades that will allow you to enjoy your favorite game day dishes without the extra side of guilt.

                                                           

Hot and Healthy Baked Buffalo Wings:

  • 3 lbs. chicken wings and drumsticks
  • 1 tbs. margarine
  • 6 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 10 crushed garlic cloves
  • 3/4 cup hot sauce
  • salt and pepper to taste

Bleu Cheese Dressing:

  • 1 cup low-fat Greek yogurt
  • 1/2 cup bleu cheese crumbles
  • scallions to garnish

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees, and lightly grease a baking dish.

2. In a large bowl, season the wings and drumsticks with salt and pepper.

3. In a sauté pan over low heat, melt margarine. Add thyme and garlic and simmer for 3 minutes. Add hot sauce and stir.

4. Pour mixture over chicken and toss to coat. Allow chicken to marinate in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.

5. Combine Greek yogurt, bleu cheese, and scallions in a small bowl. Mix well and refrigerate.

6. Transfer chicken to baking dish and place in oven. Bake for 30 minutes, turn over, and bake an additional 25 minutes. Baste wings occasionally while baking.

7. Remove pan from oven, and allow wings to cool slightly. Serve with bleu cheese dressing and celery sticks, if desired.

*1 serving of regular chicken wings: 800 calories! A serving of our Hot and Healthy Baked Buffalo Wings: 377 calories

Not So Naughty Nachos:

  • 1 16 oz. can black beans
  • 2 plum tomatoes, diced
  • 1 cup corn (fresh or frozen)
  • 1 jar salsa
  • 1/2 bag baked corn tortilla chips
  • 1/4 head shredded Romaine lettuce
  • Greek yogurt
  • Shredded cheese of your choice

1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

2. Place beans and 1/2 jar of the salsa into a food processor and combine until chunky.

3. Place chips on baking sheet. Add chunky black bean puree and spread corn, tomatoes, and remaining salsa on top. Sprinkle with cheese and bake in oven until cheese is melted.

4. Remove nachos from oven. Add shredded lettuce on top. Serve with a dollop of Greek yogurt.

*1 serving of loaded nachos with beef and cheese: 570 calories! 1 serving of our Not So Naughty Nachos: 250 calories

Sinless Potato Skins:

  • 2 medium sweet potatoes
  • 1 tsp. olive oil
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 10 oz. bag of lettuce
  • 2 scallions
  • 4-6 slices turkey bacon
  • 4 oz. reduced-fat cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup low-fat milk
  • 2 tbs. grated Parmesan cheese
  • Vegetable oil or cooking spray

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

2. Place sweet potatoes on a baking sheet lightly coated with cooking spray. Bake for 45 minutes or until fork-tender.

3. In a sauté pan, heat the olive oil and cook onion for 2-3 minutes, until soft. Add garlic and cook one more minute. Add scallions and spinach, cover and cook for 3-4 minutes, until spinach has wilted.

4. In another sauté pan, cook the turkey bacon until crisp and transfer to a paper towel to dry. When cooled, chop into small pieces and reserve.

5. When sweet potatoes are cooked, allow to cool for 5 minutes. Slice each potato in half and scoop out the inside of each into a bowl. Add cream cheese, milk, salt and pepper and mash together until smooth. Using a pastry brush, coat the outside of each potato skin with vegetable oil. Fill each skin with the filling and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Transfer skins back to the baking sheet and bake for 15-20 minutes or until tops are golden and skins are crispy.

6. Top with turkey bacon bits and serve.

*2 potato skins with cheese, bacon, and sour cream: 160-180 calories. 2 Sinless Skins: 120 calories

Skinny Cilantro Chicken Quesadillas:

  • 2 oz. boneless, skinless chicken breast
  • 1 tsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 cup low-fat plain yogurt
  • 3 tbs. reduced-fat sour cream
  • 4 10 in. whole wheat tortillas
  • 2 sliced scallions
  • 3/4 cup reduced-fat Pepper Jack cheese

1. Preheat grill to medium heat.

2. Rub chicken breast with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill, turning over every 3 minutes until fully cooked. Allow to cool, and cut into thin slices.

3. Mix cilantro, yogurt, and sour cream in a small bowl.

4. Cover one-half of each tortilla with chicken, scallions, and cheese. Fold tortillas in half and transfer to the grill. Grill until tortillas are browned and crispy, and cheese is melted (about 1 1/2-3 minutes per side). Slice each quesadilla into 4 wedges and serve with cilantro cream.

*1 regular chicken and cheese quesadilla (4 slices): 970 calories! Skinny Cilantro Chicken Quesadillas: 238 calories